Parallel Circuit Resistance 
In a series circuit (loads connected in a row end to end), it's easy to calculate total circuit resistance because you simply add up all the resistances to get the total. In a parallel circuit, the voltage is the same across all the loads; the amperage is simply added up, but the resistance is a […]
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Ohms/Continuity Basics
Some quick basics – An ohmmeter is used to measure the resistance to electrical flow between two points. The ohmmeter is most commonly used to check continuity. Continuity is not a “measurement” as much as it is a yes/no statement. To say there is continuity is to say that there is a good electrical path […]
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What is Inductive Reactance?
Ohm’s law is pretty straightforward; you multiply ohms by amps to get the voltage. Using variable E to represent voltage, variable I for amps, and variable R for ohms, the equation for Ohm’s law looks like this:  E = I × R  You can figure out the number of amps in a system using basic […]
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Ohm My
  One of the most common mistakes I hear techs make is confusing zero ohms with infinite ohms. The fuse above is showing near-zero ohms, which indicates a good electrical path with very little resistance. If there is a perfect path, it would have zero ohms (which isn't actually possible unless you happen to be […]
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