Remove “Weep” Plugs on Motors

 

In this 60-second tech tip video by Brad Hicks with HVAC in SC, he shows us how and why to remove the weep port plugs on a condensing fan motor. I know from experience that motors can fail prematurely when this practice isn't followed. Remember that motor orientation dictates which weep port plugs are removed. Generally, the ports facing down need to be removed, and the ones facing up stay in place.

Transcript

What's going on, guys? Here is a quick 60-second tech tip—it's on changing condenser fan motors. Whenever you're changing them, most all condenser fan motors have plugs that are supposed to be removed, depending on the orientation of the motor. These—since this shaft is facing down into the unit—these need to be removed. And basically, what they do is they open the weep holes, so any condensation or moisture that can get into the motor doesn't stay in there to corrode the windings and, in turn, prematurely make the motor fail. So, make sure you take those plugs out. If you don't, like that motor over there, you'll be back within a couple of years to replace it again. So, just a quick tip. Make sure you take those plugs out. Like I said, this motor is oriented this way, so you want to take the plugs out of the bottom like I just did, and your motor will last much longer. So, there you go. Thanks for watching.

—Brad Hicks

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