Changing Liquid Filter/Drier Cores Tip

This tip comes from market refrigeration and controls technician Kevin Compass. Thanks, Kevin!


A little tip when changing liquid cores:

If you start pumping them down, begin bypassing discharge gas into the shell to warm it up, push out the remaining liquid, and bring the shell above the dew point so that it doesn't sweat when you change the cores.

This helps drive out the liquid refrigerant in the shell and helps prevent moisture contamination from condensation in the shell.

Work quickly so that the system is open for the shortest possible time.

Two spring clamps make holding the lid on the cores cake so that you can put the bolts back the easy way.

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